Participants 6th graders

Music is all around us. It’s on the radio, on TV, in the background in department stores and restaurants, and even on our smartphones! Music is important in our everyday lives and it’s a common discussion topic in English, too.

This text will help you.

Students learn to talk about the music they like in English using their knowledge.

Questions:

  • What kind of music do you like?

Armenian folk

  • Are you a good singer?

I go to music school

  • Can you concentrate on other things when you are listening to music?

Yes

  • Can you play a musical instrument?

Yes piano

  • What is one of your favorite songs?
    • Why do you like it?
    • When did you first hear it?
    • Who sings it?

  • What kind of music do you usually listen to?

Classic

  • What kind of music do your parents listen to?

Old

  • What kind of music you like the most?

Rap

  • What kind of songs do you like to sing?

National

  • What kinds of music do people listen to in your country?

Armenian

  • What kinds of music do you dislike?

Rabiz

Make a video where yous speak about music.You can also write about it.

All the results will be put on our blogs.

English

TEXT 20

Mr. Knott was a teacher. He taught in a big school in London. He lived a
long way from the school, so he was usually quite tired when he got home. At
nine o’clock one evening, when he was in bed, the telephone bell rang in the
hall of his small house, so he went downstairs, picked up the telephone and
said, ‘This is Whitebridge 3165. Who’s speaking, please?’
‘Watt,’ a man answered.
‘What’s your name, please?’ said Mr. Knott.
‘Watt’s my name,’ was the answer.
‘Yes, I asked you that. What’s your name?’ Mr. Knott said again.
‘I told you. Watt’s my name,’ said the other man. ‘Are you Jack Smith?’
‘No, I’m Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott.
‘Will you give me your name, please?’ said Mr. Watt.
‘Will Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott.
Both Mr. Watt and Mr. Will Knott put their telephones down angrily
and thought, ‘That was a rude, stupid man!’


Mr. Knott was a teacher. He taught in a big school in London. He lived a
long way from the school, so he was usually quite tired when he got home. At
nine o’clock one evening, when he was in bed, the telephone bell rang in the
hall of his small house, so he went downstairs, picked up the telephone and
said, ‘This is Whitebridge 3165. Who’s speaking, please?’
‘Watt,’ a man answered.
‘What’s your name, please?’ said Mr. Knott.
‘Watt’s my name,’ was the answer.
‘Yes, I asked you that. What’s your name?’ Mr. Knott said again.
‘I told you. Watt’s my name,’ said the other man. ‘Are you Jack Smith?’
‘No, I’m Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott.
‘Will you give me your name, please?’ said Mr. Watt.
‘Will Knott,’ answered Mr. Knott.
Both Mr. Watt and Mr. Will Knott put their telephones down angrily
and thought, ‘That was a rude, stupid man!’


A. Answer these questions.

  1. Why was Mr. Knott usually tired in the evenings?

Mr knot’s house was far from school and he was very tired going to work.

  1. Why did he get up and go downstairs when he was already in bed?

He got up and went downstairs because he got a call.

  1. Who telephoned him?

Mr. Watt telephoned him.

  1. Whom did Mr. Watt want to speak to?

Mr Watt want to speak to Jack Smith.

B. Do this puzzle.
Across:

  • The name of the teacher in
    this story is Mr. Knott (two
    words).
  • ‘Whom did Mr. Knott speak
    to on the telephone?’ ‘Mr.
    Watt.’
  • Perhaps Mr. Knott went to
    the cinema on Saturday evenings
    to see a film.
  • Trees and other plants grow
    in earth.
  • Not yes. No
  • Both men in this story got
    angry when they did not
    understand each other.
  • Less polite. Ruder
  • Mr. Knott went downstairs
    because the telephone rang.
    Down:
  • We cut fruit up with this. knife
  • In how many schools did Mr.
    Knott work? ‘In one
  • Mr. Knott was a teacher.
  • Mr. Watt thought, ‘That was a
    rude, stupid man!’
  • Mr. Watt waited until someone
    answered the telephone, and
    then he spoke.
  • Perhaps Mr. Knott listened
    to the news on the radio be-
    fore he went to bed.
  1. Why was Mr. Knott usually tired in the evenings?
  2. Why did he get up and go downstairs when he was already in bed?
  3. Who telephoned him?
  4. Whom did Mr. Watt want to speak to?
  5. When Mr. Knott said, ‘Will Knott,’ what did Mr. Watt think?
  6. (He thought, ‘. . . .’)
  7. B. Do this puzzle.
  8. Across:
  9. The name of the teacher in
  10. this story is . . . . . . (two
  11. words).
  12. ‘Whom did Mr. Knott speak
  13. . . . on the telephone?’ ‘Mr.
  14. Watt.’
  15. Perhaps Mr. Knott went to
  16. the . . . on Saturday evenings
  17. to see a film.
  18. Trees and other plants grow
  19. in . . . .
  20. Not yes.
  21. Both men in this story . . .
  22. angry when they did not
  23. understand each other.
  24. Less polite.
  25. Mr. Knott went downstairs
  26. because the . . . rang.
  27. Down:
  28. We cut fruit up with this.
  29. In how many schools did Mr.
  30. Knott work? ‘In . . . .’
  31. Mr. Knott was a . . . .
  32. Mr. Watt . . . , ‘That was a
  33. rude, stupid man!’
  34. Mr. Watt waited . . . someone
  35. answered the telephone, and
  36. then he spoke.
  37. Perhaps Mr. Knott listened
  38. to the news on the . . . be-
  39. fore he went to bed.
  40. C. Write this story. Put the or nothing in each empty place.
  41. George and Dorothy go to . . . school by . . . bus in . . . morning, but
  42. they usually come home in . . . 5.15 train. George is Dorothy’s brother. He
  43. doesn’t like school: when he is at . . . home, he listens to . . . radio or plays . .
  44. . trumpet, and then he is happy. On . . . Monday morning he sometimes says,
  45. ‘I have a terrible pain in . . . stomach,’ and he does not go to . . . school with
  46. Dorothy. His father and mother are already at . . . work, so they do not
  47. know. They go to . . . work very early. Dorothy plays . . . tennis a lot. When
  48. she leaves school, she wants to go into . . . army.

Easter

Most Christians refer to the week before Easter as Holy Week, which in Western Christianity begins on Palm Sunday (marking the entrance of Jesus in Jerusalem), includes Spy Wednesday (on which the betrayal of Jesus is mourned),[9] and contains the days of the Easter Triduum including Maundy Thursday, commemorating the Maundy and Last Supper,[10][11] as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus.[12] In Eastern Christianity, the same days and events are commemorated with the names of days all starting with “Holy” or “Holy and Great;” and Easter itself might be called “Great and Holy Pascha”, “Easter Sunday,” “Pascha” or “Sunday of Pascha.” In Western ChristianityEastertide, or the Easter Season, begins on Easter Sunday and lasts seven weeks, ending with the coming of the 50th day, Pentecost Sunday. In Eastern Christianity, the Paschal season ends with Pentecost as well, but the leave-taking of the Great Feast of Pascha is on the 39th day, the day before the Feast of the Ascension.

Easter and its related holidays are moveable feasts, not falling on a fixed date; its date is computed based on a lunisolar calendar (solar year plus Moon phase) similar to the Hebrew calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established only two rules, namely independence from the Hebrew calendar and worldwide uniformity. No details for the computation were specified; these were worked out in practice, a process that took centuries and generated a number of controversies. It has come to be the first Sunday after the ecclesiastical full moon that occurs on or soonest after 21 March.[13] Even if calculated on the basis of the more accurate Gregorian calendar, the date of that full moon sometimes differs from that of the astronomical first full moon after the March equinox.[14]

Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by its name (Hebrew: פֶּסַח pesachAramaic: פָּסחָא pascha are the basis of the term Pascha), by its origin (according to the synoptic Gospels, both the crucifixion and the resurrection took place during the Passover)[15][16] and by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In most European languages the feast is called by the words for passover in those languages; and in the older English versions of the Bible the term Easter was the term used to translate Passover.[17]

Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, midnight vigils, exclamations and exchanges of Paschal greetingsclipping the church (England),[18] decoration and the communal breaking of Easter eggs (a symbol of the empty tomb).[19][20][21] The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection in Western Christianity,[22][23] traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide.[24] Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include Easter parades, communal dancing (Eastern Europe), the Easter Bunny and egg hunting.[25][26][27][28][29] There are also traditional Easter foods that vary by region and culture.

Englist text 19

Mr. Yates was nearly ninety, so it was often difficult for him to remember things, but he still liked travelling very much, so he and his wife went to Spain every year. One summer when they were there, they went to visit some friends. These people had two young daughters. One afternoon Mr. Yates was talking to one of the girls in the garden after lunch. ‘You and your sister were ill when my wife and I were here last year, weren’t you?’ he said to her. ‘Yes, we were,’ answered the girl. ‘We were very ill.’ The old man said nothing for a minute, because he was thinking. Then at last he said, ‘Oh, yes, I remember now! One of you died. Which one of you was it, you or your sister?’ The girl answered, ‘It was me.’
‘Oh? I’m very sorry to hear it,’ said the old man.

A. Answer these questions.

  1. Why did Mr. Yates not remember things very well?

Because mr. Yates was nearly ninety.

  1. Where did his friends live?

His friends lived in Spain.

  1. Who were ill when Mr. and Mrs. Yates visited Spain another time?

One girl and her sister who was in the garden.

  1. Who really died then?

The ill girl.

  • Was the girl having a joke with Mr. Yates?
  • Yes she did.
    B. Which words in the story on page 40 mean:
  • 1. almost
  • 2. not forget
  • 3. sad
  • 4. hard
  • 5. stopped living
    C. Write this story. Put one word in each empty place. You will find all
    the correct words in the story on page 40.

    Mr. and Mrs. Yates lived together for 52 years, and then she became very
    ill. After a month she died, and Mr. Yates was alone. It was hard for him to
    live in a big house without anybody else, so he married again. His new wife
    was much younger than he was, and she liked travel to foreign countries, so
    they began to go to Africa every year, in the winter. Mrs. Yates had a younger
    sister, and she usually went with them too. Everybody thought, ‘Those girls
    are that old man’s daughter.’
    One day in Kenya a man said to him, ‘Do you remember me? I was your
    neighbour in Southampton.’
    Mr. Yates did not answer for a few seconds, because he was forget Then
    he said, ‘Oh, yes! That’s right! I married your daughter, didn’t I?’

difficult — դժվար

thing — ինչ-որ բան

wife — տիկին

ill — հիվանդ

English

TEXT 18


When Tom Howard was seventeen years old he was as tall as his father, so he
began to borrow Mr. Howard’s clothes when he wanted to go out with his
friends in the evening.
Mr. Howard did not like this, and he always got very angry when he found
his son wearing any of his things.
One evening when Tom came downstairs to go out, his father stopped him
in the hall. He looked at Tom’s clothes very carefully.
Then he said angrily, ‘Isn’t that one of my ties, Tom?’
‘Yes, Father, it is,’ answered Tom.
‘And that shirt’s mine too, isn’t it?’ his father continued.
‘Yes, that’s yours too,’ answered Tom.
‘And you’re wearing my belt!’ said Mr. Howard.
‘Yes, I am, Father,’ answered Tom. ‘You don’t want your trousers to fall
down, do you?’

A. Answer these questions.
1.When did Tom begin to borrow his father’s clothes?
When Tom Howard was seventeen years old he was as tall as his father, so he
began to borrow Mr. Howard’s clothes.

2.When did he put them on?
When he wanted to go out with his friends in the evening.
3.What did Tom’s father do when he borrowed his clothes?
Mr. Howard did not like this, and he always got very angry when he found
his son wearing any of his things.
4.Which of his father’s clothes was Tom wearing in this story?
Tom was wearing tie, shirt, belt.


B. Opposites. Write these sentences. Put one word in each empty place.
1.Tom was not a short boy. He was a tall boy.
2.Mr. Howard was not happy when Tom borrowed his clothes: he was angry.
3.Mr. Howard did not gave his clothes to Tom; but Tom borrowed them.
4.Tom didn’t borrow his father’s oldest clothes. He borrowed his new ones.
5.Tom did not want his father’s trousers to fall down: he wanted
them to stay .

C. Choose the right sentence for each picture. Write it down.
1. a. Joe is as tall as his father.
b. Joe is less tall than his father.
c. Joe is taller than his father.

2.a. Tom is going upstairs.
b. Tom is coming upstairs.
c. Tom is coming downstairs.

3.a. Tom is wearing a belt.
b. Tom isn’t wearing a belt.
c. Tom’s belt has broken.